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Moving Senior Citizens to a Retirement Community



Unfortunately, there comes a time when senior citizens can no longer live independently in their family homes. Whether it is physical impediments or mental health that beings to deteriorate, various factors can make a transition necessary.

Many questions arise in the process that can be difficult to answer: What kind of care will he or she receive? How close is it to family? Who’s going to pay for all of this? What to do I do with all of my loved one’s belongings? There are several tips and a lot of information available to make the move easier for both you and the senior citizen.


When is the Right Time?

You may come across many indications that it’s time to move senior citizens into a more accommodating living environment. Not being able to go to the bathroom without assistance, forgetfulness and disorientation are just a few of the possible signals that it may be time. No longer being able to care for oneself may be embarrassing for some, and sometimes the elderly will hesitate to tell others about this. Be sure to be observant, ask questions and let them know you care.

Timing is essential, not only because your loved one might need time to mentally and emotionally prepare, but also because the moving process takes a bit longer for elderly folks. Furthermore, you can ease the realization of moving for them by being approaching the subject delicately. Take time out and really discuss the need to move, get them involved in the process, and make sure they are comfortable. Do some research ahead of time so there are lots of options available.

What Do I Throw Out?

Usually, the elderly person will be downsizing in terms of living space, so not all of his or her belongings will be able to fit in the new place. The issue of packing becomes especially difficult when seniors must leave behind cherished goods. It is important to let them have a great deal of say in what they would like to keep. A good idea is to have some kind of organizational system that indicates the level of importance each item in the home has.

Take into account the new living facility, which might even require the purchase of smaller furniture or carpet. Allow lots of time to set aside items to sell, as well. There is sometimes a great profit to be made by selling older possessions, that can often times be valuable antique and vintage items. So before you toss something in the garbage, make sure you’re not throwing away an item of great value!

Get Familiar with the New Place

If you have the opportunity, take your elderly loved one to see the new living space as often as possible. This way, you can both imagine where certain furnishings will go, and the senior citizen can become more comfortable and accepting of the space. You may even bump into other residence, making the move-in process that much more exciting.

On move-in day, be sure to take your time. Make sure everything is placed in its desired position. Taking things slowly also helps your loved one not to feel abandoned or left alone in his or her new home.

You can always suggest support groups, recreational services and groups and other socially engaging clubs to make them feel connected to others. Moving a senior citizen is a big change and presents many frightening realizations; however, if executed in the correct fashion, it can turn into an exciting transition, and even presents opportunity to connect with your elderly loved one.

3 comments :

  1. Hey, nice site you have here! Keep up the excellent work!

    Gas Appliance Repair

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  2. "Timing is essential, not only because your loved one might need time to mentally and emotionally prepare, but also because the moving process takes a bit longer for elderly folks." I totally agree. That’s why if you think your seniors already need elderly care, you should introduce the subject carefully. Don’t impose this on them. Make sure this is what they want.

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  3. “Taking things slowly also helps your loved one not to feel abandoned or left alone in his or her new home.” – Exactly. It is important to be sensitive enough to know whether your loved one feels comfortable in his/her new home already, or if he/she still needs your company a little longer. Making yourselves familiar with the nursing home staff is a good way of having a better relationship with them and better knowledge on how the welfare of your relatives would be.

    Carl Brighton

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